Mission and Values

Our Vision:

As the largest housing provider in Boston, BHA is dedicated to helping forge a strong and vibrant city where every resident has the opportunity to thrive.

Our Mission:

Our Mission

We foster sustainable communities by providing quality affordable housing, bringing stability, opportunity, and peace of mind to thousands of low and moderate-income families and individuals across Boston, and to the city as a whole.

Publicly funded housing programs are a contemporary and humane solution to the housing challenges our city faces. Our residents are the lifeblood of our community - our neighbors, friends, and coworkers. For many, BHA is the difference between home and homelessness.

How we do it:

Using state and federal funds, we ensure affordability for Boston area families and individuals through our Public Housing communities and the Section 8 rental assistance programs. We offer more than apartments and vouchers. We empower vital communities to improve quality of life, encourage self-sufficiency, and create economic opportunities. Learn more about BHA’s mission and work.

Programs

In total, BHA currently owns and/or oversees approximately 10,000 rental units of public housing in Boston and houses more than 17,000 people under the public housing program. BHA owns 56 housing developments. Of the 56 developments, 32 are designated as housing for seniors and residents with disabilities and 24 are designated for low income families. Our Mission

In addition to public housing, BHA administers approximately 14,979 rental assistance vouchers, otherwise known as Tenant-Based Section 8 vouchers, that allow families to rent in the private market and apply a subsidy to their rent. Vouchers through the Massachusetts Rental Voucher (MRVP) Program assist an additional 867 households. With this assistance, residents are able to pay approximately 30-40 percent of their income toward rent and BHA pays the remainder. BHA helps provide housing to approximately 34,000 people under these programs. In addition, BHA provides subsidy to more than 2400 households under its Section 8 Project-Based Voucher and Moderate Rehabilitation programs.

History, Leadership & Organization

Our Mission

BHA was established by the Mayor and City Council in October of 1935 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 121, secs. 26 I et seq. The federal public housing program dates back to the initial occupancy of the Mary Ellen McCormack (formerly named Old Harbor) development in May of 1938. State legislation in 1948 initiated the state-aided public housing program. The Federal Housing Choice Voucher program (Section 8) was established by the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, which was written to help address the issue of rising housing costs. Both programs have become an integral part of the government's commitment to meeting basic housing needs. Learn more about BHA's housing communities and browse a statistical overview.

BHA is managed and controlled by an Administrator who is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the Mayor of the City of Boston. On January 16, 2020, Kate Bennett was appointed Administrator, with “the power and authority to act as the Mayor’s agent with respect to all matters affecting the BHA, including without limitation the power to execute any and all documents as needed with such matters.” View the BHA's current organizational chart and Administrator's message.

Community Participation and Resident Leadership

The BHA Monitoring Committee is responsible for reviewing matters relating to the management and performance of BHA and to report these matters to the Mayor. The Monitoring Committee is appointed by the Mayor and includes nine members; at least five of those are public housing tenants and one is a Section 8 program participant.

Our Mission

The Resident Advisory Board, was established in the late 1990’s to advise Boston Housing Authority on the development and implementation of BHA’s Annual Plan. The diverse board includes residents of Family Public Housing, Elderly/Disabled Public Housing and Section 8 rental assistance who are elected through a democratic process. Read the RAB Bylaws to learn more about how the Board operates. Local Tenant Organizations (LTO’s), also known as Tenant Task Forces, are volunteer resident organizations working to advocate for their neighbors in BHA Public Housing Communities across the city. They keep residents informed of improvements, as well as operations and management needs. They work closely with management to bring social and recreational programs to their communities, and they provide feedback and input on policies and procedures to management. LTOs are governed by Boston Housing Authority’s Tenant Participation Policy and many have their own set of bylaws as well. The Tenant Participation Policy is also available in Spanish.

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